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Thursday, September 18, 2014

JGMS September 9, 1971 - Harding Theater - New to The List

A few years ago we had a good time talking around some putative Dead shows at the Harding Theater, 616  Divisadero, on September 3-4, 1971. These shows have never been known from anything other than the listing I found, and they may not have happened.

I mentioned there the odd cluster of September 1971 Garciavents at the Harding - a September 10 JGMS billing and the NRPS gig from 9/23/71, in addition to the first weekend of the month. I have one more to add to The List, a Garcia-Saunders billing at the Harding on Thursday, September 9, 1971, per both a Datebook listing and an item in the SFC.

So now we have 3rd and 4th with GD, 9th and 10th with Merl and 23rd with the New Riders, all within the same month. That may be some kind of record.

listing: DB, SFC, September 9, 1971, p. 44;
item: "Garcia, Fogerty at Harding," SFC, September 9, 1971, p. 44.

Saturday, September 13, 2014

NRPS w/o Jerry, pre-Buddy?

I had found some listings from June that had NRPS playing at a time when Garcia was known to be unavailable, June 21, 1971. I wondered what they did for pedal steel, but the question became moot when I scrolled ahead a day and found a cancellation notice.

Questions, answers, questions: I have found another conflicting listing between NRPS and GD in the pre-Buddy Cage period: August 26, 1971, with the Dead playing Gaelic Park in the Bronx, New Riders are scheduled to play the Longbranch Saloon in Berkeley (per JLW "Something Else" listing, SFC, August 25, 1971, p. 25).

I wonder if they played as a Dawson-Nelson-Torbert-Dryden quartet that night?

Szabo's Santana Sit-In, or, Santana's Jubilant Jam


I didn't see this listed at the great Santanamigos site (1971), so I thought I'd post it here: Santana sitting in with Gabor Szabo at the Concord [Jazz?] Festival, Sunday, August 15, 1971.

NRPS: July 24-25, 1971, New Monk - New to The List

listing: "Rock, Jazz This Week in Bay Area," SFC, July 23, 1971, p. 45.

New Riders are scheduled to play Freddie Herrera's New Monk Saturday-Sunday, July 24-25, 1971. Commander Cody slated to open. New to The List.

Friday, September 12, 2014

"Jerry Garcia & Merl Saunders & Tom Fogerty Sat-Sun, New Monk"

SFC 7/2/71 p. 52
Last year I spun some 1970 and early 1971 microfilm of the San Francisco Chronicle, and found seven new-to-The-List shows in a three-month span. If you follow the blog or scroll down a bit chronologically, you'll see that I have continued to discover more in the 1971-1972 period, and even as far out as 1974. I hope they are all tagged TJS-addition; that's my code for stuff that's new to The List, newly discovered Garcia shows. So long as there is nothing that fills the function of the much-missed Jerry Site, allowing updates from fan research, first-hand accounts, materials, etc., all in a classic List format, it will be especially important to track the bread crumbs that pop up along the way.

So, obviously I am searching these calendar listings and such because I believe there are still shows out there to discover, hiding in plain site on microfilm.

But, this, I never expected to find.

On Friday, July 2, the Grateful Dead played the Closing of the Fillmore West run, Garcia pulling off the rare trifecta of playing with three bands in the same day - the Rowan Brothers, the New Riders of the Purple Sage (NRPS), and the Dead. I need to think hard about when this might ever have happened again; maybe it never did. This night he played from 8:30 p.m. - 3 a.m. (Wasserman 1971).

The Fillmore West events would continue through the Fourth of July. Yet the 7/2 music listings show that Garcia would be otherwise occupied.

"Jerry Garcia & Merl Saunders & Tom Fogerty Sat-Sun, New Monk"

It would appear that on July 3-4, 1971, while Fillmore West drew most of the eyes and ears, Garcia-Saunders-Kahn-Vitt and new arrival Tom Fogerty, did some tunes. Without elaborating all of the evidence here, I think Fogerty came in only mid-1971, and maybe as recently as the week before this (i.e., around 6/25/71 or 6/26/71). Fogerty lived in a big ol' Tudor or something in Berkeley, and the New Monk specifically, and working for Freddie Herrera generally (i.e., also at Keystone Korner) seemed to be working out really well. Fogerty would inhabit the Garciaverse for 18 months. The New Monk would become Keystone Berkeley, Garcia's musical home base for more than a decade (see also data).

The Sunday night July 4th show, especially, appeals to my aesthetic - a hot summer night (I haven't actually checked that - could have been cold and foggy) in Berkeley, friends and music for the 4th.  There's something very picturesque to me, very resonant with a une certaine idée de Garcia, about him finding a way, while he could, to take advantage of the fact that the spotlight was elsewhere to just play to the beer and sawdust set. Sign me up!

REFERENCE

Wasserman, John L. 1971. When the Music Finally Stopped. San Francisco Chronicle, July 5, 1971, p. 37. 

Tom Fogerty, Merl Saunders and Friends - June 25, 1971 Keystone Korner


The title gives a listing found in "The Music Scene--Complete Listings," SFC, June 25, 1971, p. 43.

Further down the same listing is Jerry Garcia, Merl Saunders and Tom Fogerty at New Monk on Saturday-Sunday (June 26-27, 1971). I certainly do wonder if Jerry was a "Friend" at the Friday show in the City. Perhaps he told them not to list him in case he was jet-lagged. Or maybe he was doing something else.

NRPS June 21-23, 1971 Boarding House - CANCELED

San Francisco Chronicle, June 21, 1971, p. 47.
Here's an interesting one that I don't quite know what to do with - NRPS and Rowan Bothers playing the Boarding House June 21-23, 1971.

Of course, Garcia was in France on 6/21, and even gaining back 7 or 8 hours he probably couldn't have been back to the City to play on Tuesday (6/22), though it's not impossible. Wednesday 6/23, however, our hero certainly could have been back and playing.

I do wonder who was playing pedal steel these first two nights, if the NRPS ended up playing?

**update, 5 minutes later **

Sometimes the answers to our questions are closer than we think. From SFC 6/22/71, p. 37:





I guess that answers that question.

Thursday, September 11, 2014

JGMS: May 25, 1971 Keystone Korner: new to The List

San Francisco Chronicle, May 24, 1971, p. 42.

Garcia and Saunders listed for Tuesday, May 25, 1971 at Keystone Korner. New to The List.

More color around Friends and Relations and the Tuesday Fillmore West auditions.

JGMS: Matrix, May 11-12, 1971


There is a great half-hour tape labeled as Garcia-Saunders at the Matrix, May 11, 1971. I had always thought it was a little suspect, as I had never seen any other corroborating information, though it is listed at the Chicken's Matrix List.

This calendar listing from the San Francisco Chronicle (May 10, 1971, p. 45) not only puts JGMS at Matrix on Tuesday, May 11, but also Wednesday, May 12 - a new show to The List.

For color, I have been entering most everything I come across for 660 Great Highway. In 1971, I track Keystone Korner listings, since Freddie was still running it. I have also been entering the Tuesday auditions at Fillmore West whenever I find them - they have historically been absent from the Chicken's Fillmore West List, which originated in posters (of which there were none for the auditions).

No, I don't know who titular Jack is. I assume it's related to the SF mayoral elections, as many benefits seem to have been held at Friends and Relations. I assume based on today's electoral calendars that these were primaries, to select party candidates for the ca. November elections, but I don't know that.

Tuesday, September 09, 2014

JGMS: December 27-28, 1972 - Lion's Share

San Francisco Chronicle music listings, December 27, 1972, p. 44.

Garcia-Saunders-Fogerty at the Lion's Share in San Anselmo, December 27-28, 1972, as listed in San Francisco Chronicle, December 27, 1972, p. 44. Both the Hayward Daily Review and Berkeley Barb at various points listed Dr. Hook and the Medicine Show, contrary to circulating Garcia-Saunders tape (for which I have some notes that I just need to finish). But this SFC listing is later than those (day-of, for 12/27), and this info should trump earlier info.

I know there's a lot of back and forth on this show. Dave Tamarkin, Ed Perlstein, Pat Lee, and many other legendary young-at-the-timers might be able to weigh in. So there are recollections and there are tape labels, and now at least there's a fragment of hard contemporary evidence.

Corry, what's up with Stoneground being broadcast by KSJO-FM out of the Bodega in Campbell?

Sunday, September 07, 2014

David Nichtern and the Nocturnes

http://www.concertvault.com/david-nichtern/record-plant-november-09-1974.html

What an interesting looking little fragment. I wish I could hear it.

In All GSCBF All The Time news, I suspect that Nichtern hooked up with his band, including Hot Band pedal steel player Hank Devito, as well as Nicolette Larson, through the GSCBF. They were all there.

JGMS: June 11, 1974 Keystone Berkeley - new to The List


So here's a new one for The List: JGMS at Keystone on Tuesday, June 11, 1974.

But note, too, that Merl is playing Sand Dunes on Monday the 10th - this could very easily be a Monday on which Garcia sat in. The fact that Tony Saunders played with Merl and Jerry the week prior (June 4 and June 6) makes it seem even more likely to me. The fact that Jerry played under Merl's billing on May 31-June 1 at the Inn of the Beginning is also suggestive.

No proof will ever turn up, of course, so this can remain little more than speculation. But I sure would have liked to belly up to the bar at the Sand Dunes on this Monday, in the thick fog and salt, and catch some tunes.

Read more:

 

Friday, September 05, 2014

JGMS October 5, 1972 - Keystone - new to The List


I have Friday and Saturday shows in The List, but this Thursday listing is new to me.

Fragments

Look at how my eye focuses - I want the listings big enough to read, and I want the publication information along with them, if possible. That's the scanning area I created and captured here.

Look what gets cut, "on the margins" of my view, you might say. Besides the adult theaters, there's some Maya Angelou action (there are a bunch of listings for her readings around this time) and, more importantly to me, a full schedule for the Black Expo at the Civic Auditorium. The piece that's recoverable is the piece that came as a by-product of my main focus. And what do I find but a Merl Saunders listing for Friday, September 8, 1972 in the main hall of the SF Civic Auditorium?

A few days ago I found information about Merl Saunders, September 7-10, 1972: Black Expo '72 in the Night Times, but nothing more specific. Ever hopeful, I said "[It'd be] Be neat to see which day(s) he played, with whom, and what". Well, at least I know more about the "when" part - Friday 9/8 - but not the other stuff. I wonder what Gar was doing that night? They would play a black music event May 29-30, 1973 at the Ash Grove, Garcia was free on a Friday, so anything's possible.

I doubt it happened, but I still wonder what it was. I have to assume this would be the Heavy Turbulence band, with Reverend Ron Stallings on tenor sax, Peter Welker on trumpet, Merl, not sure who else. Tony hadn't started playing to that level yet in summer 1972, I don't think.

Anyway, the Merl info caught my mind, but intersectionality and (in) visibility are worth me keeping in focus.

Linkage

Was just enjoying Dead Sources on the nightmare scenario that unfolded at Georgetown on 10/23/70, and appreciating LIA's work curating this material. There is so much out there, I cannot keep up!

Thanks, LIA, for putting this stuff out there. Having the texts directly available is invaluable.

I wanted to riff from that and urge both all of my readers to follow the action at the links I keep to the right. I have them classified roughly as presenting data or analysis (though of course most do both). I myself keep RSS feeds and try to at least have a sense of what everyone is working on.

Shoulders to Stand On


There is some great work being done. Thank you, bloggers! If you know of other blogs I should link, please pass them along in comments. Thanks!

Finally, I want to encourage  anyone looking for a hobby, or who has a little interest in, say, doing some data analysis projects, some spatial work, or who is into digitizing, analyzing, and thinking about liner notes ... join the club! It's fun, and there are more data floating around than there is computing power trying to analyze it.

Tuesday, September 02, 2014

Fun with Color

Here is all kinds of color, from one John L. Wasserman column in the San Francisco Sunday Examiner and Chronicle Datebook from August 13, 1972:


Mike Bloomfield, Elvin Bishop, and Johnny Winter jammed together a few days ago at Keystone Korner. This interests me because I am trying to piece Summer 1972 back together (see Corry), and Bloomfield's movements are probably just as relevant (and more helpful, since he's more in the press) as the Merl and/or John Kahn movements. Of course, I am sure the music was good, though I actively don't love the first two, and have barely listened to the latter.

Pierce Street Annex has moved around the corner and now occupies the old Matrix club at 3138 Fillmore. This puts some time parameter around the Garcia-Guaraldi crossings at the Pierce Street Annex in the summer of '72 - presumably couldn't have been very much before this 8/13/72 publication (where "very much" might mean two weeks?).

There are also several Country Joe items in here, Yellow Shark take note.

JGMS August 5-6, 1972 Lion's Share - new to The List

As the title says, per listing under the North Bay section, center column.






Lots of other interesting stuff, by way of color.

Summer '72

John L. Wasserman item in the Datebook of July 23, 1972, p. 25: "The Grateful Dead and crew are currently mixing down some 60 hours of music from their spring tour of Europe for fall release".

Saw something from Night Times from about that time, with prospective release date of October 5, 1972.

I note this because, in view of Corry's thesis about the crisis in Garcia's side projects in summer 1972, due to (temporarily/almost) "losing" Merl and John to Bloomfield [http://lostlivedead.blogspot.com/2011/10/john-kahn-live-performance-history-1972.html], I have been wondering what else Jerry was up to. Besides playing at the Pierce Street Annex with Vince Guaraldi, that is. This snippet reminds me that they were probably working hard to get E72 together. Not the same as scratching his itch to play all the time, but not like he was twiddling his thumbs, either.

Monday, September 01, 2014

This'll make you crazy





Jerry Garcia and Merl Saun- are a fragment at the second column of listings.  I guess we'll find them at the Keystone Korner on 6/30, if that's what this listing would have been getting at ... but we'll never know.

Night Times

So, I have now gone through all of the Night Times that were held at the San Francisco Public Library.

It appears I have not been able to consult the following presumed issues:

May 31, - June 13, 1972
July 12-25, 1972
July 26 - August xxx, 1972
August xxx-xxx, 1972
August xxx - September 5, 1972

Since I like integrality in my sources, I'd love to consult, scan and data-enter stuff from those dates!

Note that it went to weekly from the September 20-26, 1972 issue, Garcia cover as we'd say. But then the next week's issue, 9/27-10/3, is the last issue held at the SF Public Library.

Anyone know what happened to Night Times after that?

I contacted Joel Selvin, who confirmed that the paper "lasted a year. The Merle [sic]-Jerry-Tom issue was the last one. I went to work for the Chronicle about six weeks later."

After the jump, a listing via a dir command of what I have from NT


Early Chez Panisse


Photog John Humble gets a nice shot of Chez Panisse, not long after it opened. Accompanies a positive review by Hut Landon, entitled "A new French restaurant in an old Berkeley house"," Night Times, September 15-28, 1971, p. 2.

Jamming For The Hell Of It

Ain't this pretty paper? Selvin nails the essence of the thing.


Merl Saunders, September 7-10, 1972: Black Expo '72

Merl Saunders is noted as participating in this big event at the SF Civic Auditorium, known variously as Black Quake or Black Expo '72. Be neat to see which day(s) he played, with whom, and what!



Oh yeah, this is the first time I have seen Night Times spell Merl's first name correctly - took them a year or so!

See also note on 5/28/72 Merl Saunders gig. Note as well my discussion of race in the "Jerry Garcia of Garcia-Saunders" post.

Jerry Garcia and David Bromberg, June 1972

David Bromberg played the Boarding House, 960 Bush Street (San Francisco, CA,94109) June 13-17, 1972.





Robert Dunn wrote a nice review in Night Times. This drew my eye because I recalled that Jerry recorded tracks for Demon in Disguise around this time. Indeed, he did:
Table xxx. Jerry Garcia and David Bromberg: Demon in Disguise sessions, Wally Heider's, June 21-24, 1972.
So I looked at this review to see if maybe there was a hidden Garcia-Bromberg Shared Stage ... but it was not to be. The reviewer never tells us which night he saw, but he does mention that harmonica player Will Scarlett came out and blew some - there's a 1st degree of Shared Stage separation, since Jerry and Scarlett played together any number of times. But it ain't Garcia playing with Bromberg.

Anyway,sound like some good shows, and there are some nice ads on the page, for color.



Jerry Garcia of Garcia-Saunders



Love this for the Keystone Korner, ca. May 1, 1972, sounds like Selvin to me: "With Jerry Garcia of Garcia-Saunders out of town, not too much happening right now." (listing: Night Times, May 3-16, 1972, p. 5.)

In addition to reinforcing my point about the symbiosis between Jerry and Freddie, how quickly and deeply it forged in this period, the idea of "Jerry Garcia of Garcia-Saunders" tickles me, probably the only time these words have ever been written.

There are periods, such as the second half of 1974, at least, when he's on record with it, when all he might have wanted to be was "Jerry Garcia of Garcia-Saunders". That's a Jerry Garcia of more circumscribed professional ambition, mostly a local guy, one of those guys whose name you'd see year after year in combing through Bay Area music listings; a guy whose name you don't have to write in 36 point Marquee, or even in bold in the big City column, a guy who never visits the 3-Dot Lounge constructed wholly of legendary SF columnist Herb Caen's mentions. He's like Mike Finnigan of Finnigan & Woods, maybe. Probably super-talented, hopefully made a great and satisfying life for himself playing music. Had his moments of professional achievement and, as human, his fallow periods. Cool.

Musically, Jerry Garcia of Garcia-Saunders is probably playing more Merl stuff (or, as Night Times, perhaps Selvin? seems to have insisted on having it, as I insist on rednering it, "Merle [sic] Saunders" stuff), more black secular contemporary, R&B, blues, soul, jazz and funk and fusion, more Legion of Mary, eventually (1979), if the same path unfolds with Jerry that unfolded without him, something like Reconstruction, horns and disco elements. Tony Saunders growing into his bass, if the 1974-1975 material we have of them together is any indication, is gonna push Jerry all sorts of sideways as John Kahn, for all of his erudition and, when healthy, talent in these idioms could never do. In many ways, this is one of Garcia's key musical roads not taken.

Why didn't he take it? Quick answers to a huge question.

First, the most Garciacentric view: it would have limited him too much musically, or professionally, or both. I do not advocate this view, nor do I reject it. I won't even evaluate it here. I'll just say it's a a possibility. At the very least, it's possible that Garcia thought this, and/or that others around him advocated this view.

Second, the Grateful Dead just had too much pull - "This battle station is ... fully ... operational." That's a big part of the story. It's more complicated than the Death Star imagery implies, though. Garcia needed the Dead and the Dead needed Garcia, their DNAs were too interwoven, the fabric of their lives too mutually imbricated to permit for any clean extraction, clean separation. The Grateful Dead became the sine qua non of his life, more central than his wives, children, friends.

Third, maybe the same story as the first two: ego, ambition, drive. The need to stake claim to his name, his thing, proper. Is it any coincidence that The Jerry Garcia Band is borne at the latest within a couple of months of Jerry and Merl splitting up in mid-1975? Of course not. This was driven by claiming his name in many senses, the key but quotidian one of monetizing it and capturing those rents as well as the big, the-man's-life's-journey big picture. Let's call this "claiming his name".

Fourth, the Saunders-centric perspective: Jerry couldn't hang with where Merl and Tony were musically. Identified for the record and without comment.

Fifth, simply, it wasn't quite what he wanted in his non-GD musical life, repertorially and stylistically speaking. I think what he wanted was what he settled on (tautology alert!), neither predominantly black (as perhaps a Merl-Tony outfit would have been) nor too white (as NRPS, OAITW, GASB, were). JGB #21b was the combination of all of the relevant genres, with Melvin Seals, Gloria Jones and Jaclyn LaBranch bringing the black church feel that the Saunders outfits lacked --again, this was black secular contemporary-- with the whole band able to do that plus R&B, a little reggae, and all the white Americana that JGB sampled in cross-section, sipping from the pool. In equilibrium, Garcia's musical palette included all of these things (to say nothing of Grateful Dead music). A lifetime of Garcia-Saunders music was probably just off the equilibrium path of history.

There's of course more to say, but I'll stop repeating the questions: What would "Jerry Garcia of Garcia-Saunders" have looked like? Why might we have entered that alternate universe, or why didn't we?

Sunday, August 31, 2014

Jerry and Freddie, mid-March 1972



Above are the music listings from Night Times, March 8-21, 1972.

Check 'em out if you're interested, of course, but let me be Garciacentric and offer the following tidbit, about the deepening relationship between Jerry Garcia (et al.) and Freddie Herrera: Jerry and Merl --Night Times misspelled his name without fail through this point, always adding the erroneous 'e' to his first name-- as I say, Jerry and Merl played for Freddie 8 times in 11 nights between Wednesday the 8th and Sunday the 18th. Here's a table view:

Table xxx. Jerry and Freddie, 8 gigs in 11 nights, March 8-18, 1972
Both weeks, it's Wednesday-Thursday at Keystone Berkeley --formerly the New Monk and renamed, as far as this evidence goes, as from the March 8th JGMS show!-- and Friday-Saturday at Keystone Korner in the City. The Keystone Berkeley would continue operating as such for a dozen years, based in large measure on the informal partnership --I believe that nothing was written down-- between Jerry Garcia and Freddie Herrera. It worked really well for a really long time.

Note that Armando Peraza is billed consistently with JGMS during this period.

JGMS January 28-29, 1972 Keystone Korner - CANCELED





Interesting to see Jerry Garcia and Merle [sic] Saunders billed for Keystone Korner on Friday-Saturday, January 28-29, 1972. Suggests that, as of whenever the deadline for these listings might have been, a second weekend for the Hooteroll? tour had not yet been pinned down. #AHATT.

According to listing in the next day's HDR, Grootna filled the open spot. Hopefully The Fabulous Geoffrey didn't lose a payday when Garcia-Saunders empted him from that February 3-4 space, part of a 3-4-5 run, maybe to make it up to Freddie for having to cancel the weekend before. Maybe he opened for them.

Color: January 12-25, 1972 Night Times listings



Here are some listings from the Night Times, with a few scattershot thoughts.

1) The Berkeley Night Times is a gem.

2) It's especially good re race

The range of clubs it covers exceeds most other sources - you've got the country clubs, the rock clubs, the black soul/R&B/gospel clubs, the Latin clubs, a little bit of the crooner set, a little of everything. I think I have noted, and Corry and I have certainly discussed so he may have noted, as well, the racial disparities in our work, derived in part from the material fact of the source materials we use. The white college kids and hippies going to the Longbranch, to say nothing of the martini set at the Circle Star, probably generated more paper, and certainly more enduring (i.e., filmed, digitized) paper, than did the folks getting their gospel on at the On Broadway or one of the Oakland rooms. Night Times had informants seemingly quite consistently across a wide set of sociocultural (and hence musical) strata - valuable stuff for future researchers who might want to look at how race played though all of it.

3) Some foreground, and not just color: JGMS 1/14-15/72

There's also a piece of foreground for me, in this listing. Garcia-Saunders have the January 14-15, 1972 weekend at Keystone Korner, still a Freddie Herrera joint.

I have done up some listening notes for the delightful tape of the Saturday show. It's the only tape fragment between 9/25/71 and 2/6/72, and it's worth a listen - very sweet, indeed.

And yet, as I continue to p.6 (looks like their ads expanded and so did their listings around late 1971, after maybe two months), I see JGMS listed for the same nights at the Lion's Share.

A Jerry Divided Against Itself Cannot Stand

To recap, there are four pieces of contemporary evidence, of uncertain independence (relative to each other, including relative to some common prior cause).

  1. listing: Hayward Daily Review, January 13, 1972, p. 35:  Jerry Garcia and Friends at Keystone Korner;
  2. listing: Night Times, January 12-25, 1972, p. 5: Jerry Garcia and Merle [sic] Saunders at KK;
  3. listing: Night Times, January 12-25, 1972, p. 6: Jerry Garcia, Merle [sic] Saunders and Tom Fogerty at Lion's Share
  4. http://db.etree.org/shninfo_detail.php?shnid=8644, the circulating audience tape says KK.

Based on a preponderance of the evidence standard, I'll go with KK, but I am open to arguments either way.


4) Stoned Sunday rap info?

Joel Selvin or someone at Night Times drops this tidbit into the listing: "fresh from being interviewed by Charles Reich and Jann Wenner (whew!)". I need to check when the Rolling Stone piece, because he might be reacting to its published length. Otherwise, I wonder if this is a scrap from telephone game that helps us pin down the dating of this event? Here's a scenario: Garcia talks about how long these stoned raps were, or he mentions it to Freddie, Freddie tells Selvin over the phone and they have a chuckle about it, it's good fresh banter if the interviews just took place. Could have happened. That'd put the rap (or is it raps? I can't recall) sometime between Christmas 1971 and the second week of January 1972.

5) What Would You See?

Lots of great music happening in the Bay Area during this fortnight. Besides the Garcia stuff, I don't know what I'd pick, if I had to pick one. Doc Watson would be good. The George Duke Trio gig at El Matador is tempting, I wonder who was in that band? You'd be deaf for a week after that synth assault.

6) Other Notes

Gideon and Power always intrigues because I have it in my head that Melvin Seals was part of the band (Power) at some point. The Night Times has some cool little asides about Gideon, who seems to have been quite the showman with his "hard-driving gospel soul".

The aside about Malo is also interesting, because it brings the Latin scene into focus. The band had gotten and/or would get lots of press, as part of an exploding Latin scene in San Francisco that had Carlos Santana's fingerprints all over it. Malo was a sort of supergroup with all kinds of hot players. The listing blurbs it as "a local big band that is fronted by Carlos Santana's brother Jorge and that has a Warner's album scheduled for release this month". I have some other 1971-1972 listings and such to go through and Cesar's Band at Cesar's Club, Luis Gasca, the percussionists Armando Peraza and Mongo Santamaria, and all kinds of other maniacs were tearing up the clubs. This whole scene feels very heavily fueled to me.

7) "All the beer you can drink"

One last piece, another piece of Fred Herrera color, as he is getting the New Monk, which would become Keystone, up and running at 2119 University in Berkeley. Ever the entrepreneur, the deals sound great: Clover is the regular band on Monday night, $1 and free food; Doobie Brothers on Thursdays, $2.50 and all the beer you can drink. Forget the still-scrappy Doobies, "all the beer you can drink"? I am on that.

Saturday, August 30, 2014

The Mission

"No matter what comes down, the Mission always looks the same"


Jerry Garcia Sometime Before Christmas





Night Times, published out of Berkeley for about a year (as far as I know) in 1971-1972, is a treasure. I found a review of Chez Panisse just shortly after it opened, but it's loaded with great music, art, etc. content.

Anyway, I liked this one, from the December 23, 1971 - January 3, 1972 issue, for what it says about Jerry's life at this time. He is listed as appearing at Keystone Korner (still run by Freddie Herrera) "sometime before Christmas". I wonder if, toward the end of his life, he ever actively mourned such freedom? Or had it been dead and buried so long that it no longer crossed his mind?

The Fat Man Is Back - LN jg1987-02-24.jgb.all.aud-pinney-gems.82610.flac1644



Poster for JGB 2/24/87 at the Santa Cruz Civic Auditorium on Tuesday, February 24, 1987, image courtesy of Wolfgang's Vault.

Since I gathered an ad and a few listings in Santa Cruz, I gave the 2/24/87 JGB show at the Civic Aud a spin and discovered a great tape (a single one in circulation, thanks to taper Tom Pinney and all involved in getting his tape into the Official Record) of a Garcia Band sounding really good and band leader who sounds cogent, focused, engaged, and increasingly frisky. I'd need to listen to more of the surrounding shows to get a really clean sense, but I if I draw a straight line between some of the Rock Bottom shows (and even some of the early 1986 shows) to the great 18 months that would begin on 8/29/87 and end on 5/19/89, I pass right through this show on the way up. (I do now see that I wasn't doing backflips over 3/14/87.)

I cannot believe Bill Graham Presents ran this with what we might render today as #thefatmanisback, nor that the Garcia people allowed it to run. But here we are! That Lucky Old Sun is a stunningly improbable highlight for me. I never thought I'd hear of it highlighting, less still writing of it. I usually find it a bore. But of this version, on this listen, I have nothing but love. Let's use TLOS as a window on the show.


! song: That Lucky Old Sun [Allan | deaddisc]: The great Tin Pan Alley songwriter Haven Gillespie wrote this reverie with the lesser-known Beasley Smith, a glimpsed-thought-turns-philosophical-truism solar daydream, which makes a really good point. Americana? How about Frankie Laine, Sarah Vaughan, Dean Martin, Frank Sinatra, Sarah Vaughan and Louis Armstrong covering your song -- in 1949 alone! Tony Bennett, Pat Boone, Johnny Cash, Ray Charles, Sam Cooke, Bing Crosby, Bobby Darin, Aretha Franklin, Jerry Lee Lewis, Willie Nelson, the Righteous Brothers, and too many others to name would follow.

Jerry put it in his repertoire immediately after the coma, draping it in mournful hopefulness, the man who six months earlier lay at death's door, three weeks in the hospital coming back to something like life, thinking "Man, if I get out of here, I'm gonna play every chance I get" (Vaughn 1987, 80), now coming back to health, regaining strength, maybe the coma wrung the junk-sickness out of him, too, because he's clear-headed for the first time in forever, like more than a decade depending on how you reckon it, and he's playing a neat little gig at the Santa Cruz Civic, the breathtaking little Civic Aud, and he's working his craft. Check out the Jerry Band on a Tuesday night, a worknight, February 24, 1987, and hear him right where he belongs, in a sweet little room working up a slice of Americana for an appreciative listener. It's not perfect, but it's careful, attentive arranging, singing and guitar playing. The song is perfect for JGB #21b because Melvin can swirl up a sweet, colorful Sunday garland right around your ears, drape it around you a little, the ladies supply the backing diaphragm that lets Jerry focus on articulation, phrasing, breath management, and the band simmers it just right, so there's room for the same guitar feel, well plucked and articulate rather than face-melting (though Jerry still plays LOUD!). You don't have to love Garcia to concede him his place, doing this song – see 2/24/87 for what I hope is the open and shut argument.

The whole show and tape have this sweet feel. Garcia sounds great, the band sounds great, the tape sounds great, and I wish I had been able to sit in deco splendor on this night, maybe drink some club soda and commune with the Jerry Band. "The Fat Man Is Back," indeed!

Jerry Garcia Band
Civic Auditorium
307 Church Street
Santa Cruz, CA 95060

February 24, 1987 (Tuesday)
Pinney shnid-82610

--set I (7 tracks, 50:09)--
s1t01. //Cats Under The Stars [#7:52] [1:34]
s1t02. Forever Young [8:48] [0:17]
s1t03. [0:20] Stop That Train [7:49] ->
s1t04. Run For The Roses [5:22] [0:11]
s1t05. And It Stoned Me [6:45] ->
s1t06. My Sisters And Brothers [4:10] ->
s1t07. D//eal [6:#53] (1) [0:08]

--set II (6 tracks, 57:29)--
s2t01. [0:47] Harder They Come [9:49] [0:17]
s2t02. I Shall Be Released [7:23] [0:09]
s2t03. [0:10] Think [7:49] [0:07] % [0:16]
s2t04. Dear Prudence [10:55] [0:06]
s2t05. That Lucky Old Sun [9:53] ->
s2t06. Tangled Up In Blue [9:38] (2) [0:09]

! ACT1: Jerry Garcia Band #21b
! lineup: Jerry Garcia - guitar, vocals;
! lineup: John Kahn - bass;
! lineup: Melvin Seals - keyboards;
! lineup: Jaclyn LaBranch - backing vocals;
! lineup: Gloria Jones - backing vocals;
! lineup: David Kemper - drums.

JGMF:
! Recording: symbols: % = recording discontinuity; / = clipped song; // = cut song; ... = fade in/out; # = truncated timing; [ ] = recorded event time. The recorded event time immediately after the song or item name is an attempt at getting the "real" time of the event. So, a timing of [x:xx] right after a song title is an attempt to say how long the song really was, as represented on this recording.
! JGC: https://jerrygarcia.com/show/1987-02-24-civic-auditorium-santa-cruz-ca/
! db: http://db.etree.org/shn/82610 (Tom Pinney MAC, this fileset, only known source!).
! map: https://goo.gl/maps/kkDtK
! venue: http://jerrygarciasbrokendownpalaces.blogspot.com/2011/09/civic-auditorium-307-church-st-santa.html
! handbill: http://images.wolfgangsvault.com/jerry-garcia-band/poster/memorabilia/SCC870224-PO.jpg
! ad: Good Times, February 19, 1987, p. 21;
! listing: Good Times, February 19, 1987, p. 30;
! historical: Rather remarkably, the WV handbill has the tagline "The Fat Man Is Back". Jerry must have been in a sporting mood about it, I guess. Tuesday night gig, Garcia sounds amazingly clear and focused. This show is a delight to hear, after the darkness of the Rock Bottom series. This is a man working his craft with newfound enthusiasm. He is still regaining strength and stamina - the sets are about an hour. But he definitely sounds like he's getting stronger. Two snaps up on this vintage 1987 JGB.
! R: field recordist: Tom Pinney;
! R: field recording equipment: 2x Beyer M88 (XY 90 degrees) > Sony D5 MAC;
! R: field recording location: FOB Center - 20' from stage;
! R: lineage: cassette (1), Tape from the collection of: Russ Cansler;
! R: Cassette Transfer: By Todd Evans: Cassette (1) > JVC TD-V1050 cassette deck -> Lynx Two A/D (24-bit, 44.1kHz) -> Wavelab 6.0. Transferred February 15, 2007. Edited and Remastered:  Wavelab 6.0 with Waves Plugins and Ozone. Dithered L2,type2,ultra 16/44.1  SBE FREE by Jamie Waddell. a www.shnflac.net **GEMS** production  February 16, 2007.
! R: seeder notes: "a very solid recording"; "first circulating source of this show, 20 years later";
"very strong version of Think"; "tape flip at the start of Deal"; "seamless transition between the discs"
! R: seeder notes: "Big Thanks To Todd Evans for the Transfer! And Sincere Gratitude to Tom Pinney for Taping and Russ Cansler for the genorosity and insight to share this missing show with GEMS and the community as a whole!"
! P: Jerry sounds in great voice this night. Very nice. This is an excellent all around show, not a weak spot in it.
! R: s1t07 Deal tape flip at start
! s1t07 (1) JG: "We'll be back in a few minutes."
! P: s2t05 TLOS is a great example of Garcia being attentive and careful in his vocal delivery. He's locked in. This version has some deliberate guitar playing, but nothing super-incendiary, which he could sometimes achieve in the unlikely setting of this song. Hits something cheeky at 6, again 6:25, reminding you he's playing rock, big downward thing 6:33, Melvin comes in big, on cue, scrubbing 6:59. This is an excellent version of a song that I normally don't pay much attention to. Melvin' swirly thing across 7:30. He always plays it the same, but it works; i.e., this is a good arrangement. Nice careful singing 9:15ff, nicely done. Very, very nice. Sounds gorgeous.
! song: That Lucky Old Sun (s2t05): The great Tin Pan Alley songwriter Haven Gillespie wrote this reverie with the lesser-known Beasley Smith, a glimpsed-thought-turns-philosophical-truism solar daydream, which makes a really good point. Americana? How about Frankie Laine, Sarah Vaughan, Dean Martin, Frank Sinatra, Sarah Vaughan and Louis Armstrong covering your song -- in 1949 alone! Tony Bennett, Pat Boone, Johnny Cash, Ray Charles, Sam Cooke, Bing Crosby, Bobby Darin, Aretha Franklin, Jerry Lee Lewis, Willie Nelson, the Righteous Brothers, and too many others to name would follow. Jerry put it in his repertoire immediately after the coma, draping it in mournful hopefulness, the man who six months earlier lay at death's door, three weeks in the hospital coming back to something like life, thinking "Man, if I get out of here, I'm gonna play every chance I get" (Vaughn 1987, 80), now coming back to health, regaining strength, maybe the coma wrung the junk-sickness out of him, too, because he's clear-headed for the first time in forever, like more than a decade depending on how you reckon it, and he's playing a neat little gig at the Santa Cruz Civic, the breathtaking little Civic Aud, and he's working his craft. Check out the Jerry Band on a Tuesday night, a worknight, February 24, 1987, and hear him right where he belongs, in a sweet little room working up a slice of Americana for an appreciative listener. It's not perfect, but it's careful, attentive arranging, singing and guitar playing. The song is perfect for JGB #21b because Melvin can swirl up a sweet, colorful Sunday garland right around your ears, drape it around you a little, the ladies supply the backing diaphragm that lets Jerry focus on articulation, phrasing, breath management, and the band simmers it just right, so there's room for the same guitar feel, well plucked and articulate rather than face-melting (though Jerry still plays LOUD!). You don't have to love Garcia to concede him his place, doing this song – see 2/24/87 for what I hope is the open and shut argument.
! s2t06 (2) JG: "Thanks a lot. See ya later."

REFERENCE:

Vaughan, Chris. 1987. (Grateful) Dead Fingers Talk. Spin 3, 4 (July): 74-76, 80.

GD September 3, 1972, Folsom Field, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, CO

I have posted on this show once, but only to link these breathtaking photos:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/34917706@N07/sets/72157622061027813

Photos, I gather, by Joe Calvin.

I have always thought there's a dissertation or book to do about music at colleges and universities. Corry has hipped me to their importance in economy, among other things. The Dead in Boulder is a great case study. But, no time!

Links:
http://www.dead.net/show/september-3-1972